Jasmin Seitzer - Personalized training for you and your horse
RSS Follow Become a Fan

Recent Posts

The gymnastics saga continues!
Step two gymnastics for the green/unconfident horse
Gymnastics to increase your horse's confidence and co-ordination (or to teach him to jump from square one)
One month with Mo
We moved to Florida!!!

Categories

Horse care
Lessons
Stories
Training
powered by

My Blog

The gymnastics saga continues!

This marks the third post of jumping gymnastics. These are designed for a few scenarios:

1. Green horse new to jumping
2. Unconfident horse needing to gain muscle strength, coordination, and confidence over fences
3. Horses coming back to jumping work needing to build up strength
4. Horses who need to refine their skills and polish their jumping form (the first few lessons will be refreshers for this horse)

SO at this point your horse should be confident and comfortable over trot poles, canter poles, and a simple gymnastic of trot poles to a small cross rail.

Step two gymnastics for the green/unconfident horse

If you haven't read my first gymnastics post, please head back and check it out! It goes over the basics needed before training your horse to jump. 

If you have read it, by this time your horse should be consistently and confidently working over trot poles and canter poles in various areas of your riding space. If you are unsure, spend a bit more time on those before moving on. You can also continue varying the trot and canter poles by raising alternating sides of the rails with a small riser.

Gymnastics to increase your horse's confidence and co-ordination (or to teach him to jump from square one)


I wanted to start a mini-series on setting up gymnastics at home for your horse. 

Most of these upcoming exercises will be easy for a young, green horse. 

They are designed to be worked in order. Each task should be completed, and ridden until the horse is 100% reliable with the particular setup, before moving on. 


The first step to get your horse comfortable with Jumping Gymnastics is trotting poles. Depending on your individual horse, the measurement between poles will be 3-5'. For example, my 14.

One month with Mo

Last week marked the completion of one month's training with a beautiful Morgan named Mo. Mo came to me after a long break from working under saddle. His owner had worked with him before that break, but there were a few issues. She hired a few trainers in the mean time to try to iron out the kinks, but they did not work out for various reasons. 

Mo is a very sweet horse, who I would rate as being somewhat insensitive and a bit slow to respond to cues. I believe that he remembers what certain things mean, but only vaguely, and in addition to that, he wasn't sure how to make his body perform what I asked of him.

We moved to Florida!!!

Last week, we started a huge adventure! I have been seeing lots of success in Minnesota, other than the subzero temperatures!!! I decided it was time to take an adventure and bring my training to Florida!!! Sadie traveled with a professional horse hauler and I was so utterly impressed with the care she received while on-board! 

Sadie moved to a neighborhood called Pinellas Park. Pinellas park is a horse-heavy community! Multiple barns on every block, horse-specific crosswalks, the works!! The city park is called Helen Howarth park and includes all the usual ammenities of a local park - picnic areas, baseball fields, playground - in addition to a BEAUTIFUL horse facility!

Why do you keep saying "Right Rein" when I'm turning left???

We need to talk. 

Riding a horse involves coordination, balance, strength and patience. As you progress, you work towards higher goals and raise your expectations of you and your horse. suddenly, you can feel your horse making decisions, changing balance, speed and focus, and you never noticed these things before. One of the biggest transitional changes if the use of the outside rein. 

In beginning riding lessons, we learn to look left and open the left rein to turn left. Simple, right? As you progress, you work towards riding the horse underneath you instead of just pointing the horse's nose where they need to go.

Don't forget to keep yourself and your horse happy!

Horseback riding is a tough sport. It takes a lot of work, sweat, dedication, and commitment. Many people spend hours and hours in the saddle practicing keeping a posting trot rythym, holding two point for laps and laps and laps, and perfecting "inside leg to outside rein". We want the best for our horses. We feed high quality grain, try to give the best hay available, and continually buy new tack, expensive treats, and not to mention riding apparel for ourselves. 

But all the dollars and time spent means nothing if you and your horse aren't working towards better communication.

Some thoughts on showing

Horse shows aren't for everyone. There is a lot of prep time, pressure, goals, and lets not forget they aren't free. 

But there are many benefits to showing. Even small local shows give riders the opportunity to work towards tangible goals, and to show off their skills and be proud of their achievements. There is also the added benefit of another professional horseperson watching your ride and objectively judging your skills. At local schooling shows, most judges are willing to talk to you after your ride to point out areas for improvement.

Pony play day!

Two weekends ago, I had the pleasure of sharing some of my horse knowledge and one of the best lesson horses ever with a family one of my students visiting from out of town. 

All three of the students have ridden before, but have varying levels of skill, and are different ages. Everyone had the ability to ride Tiffany, so we decided to do 3 shorter back to back lessons with some grooming and learning before and after.  Most riding camps focus on western riding, but all three had agreed beforehand that we would learn enlgish riding today!

No stirrup November!



No stirrup November is coming to a close. It is a good time to focus on adding in extra challenges to your normal routine. Currently a video is being made with some fun clips.

If you haven't worked without stirrups yet, there are still a few days in November! and you don't have to limit your muscle-building fun to just one month! 

Start slow, just with walking... and hold your leg in the same position as if you had stirrups: knee on the knee roll, heel below your hip, and remember to sit up tall.
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint